Windows 10 Version 1709 Failure

Of all the Windows versions, I have enjoyed Windows 10 the most, that is up until about 6 months ago.  My particular Windows 10 installation is an upgrade from Windows 7.  It always seems that, when you upgrade from one major Windows version to another, there are problems.

Windows 10 had one big difference from previous versions.  When updates were needed, it would do them mostly without letting me know what it was doing.  I wasn’t particularly comfortable with this arrangement, but such is progress.  It was possible to check on what updates were being installed.  To do this, one had to search for the information.

About 6 months ago, Windows 10 informed me that an update had failed.  In the update window, a button said Fix Issues.  I clicked that button and was ultimately presented with an ominous warning.  The new update might make some of the music and videos on my system unusable because Windows had changed Digital Rights Management.  This scared me from clicking the OK, I understand button, and Windows Update seemed to be somewhat satisfied for a while.

This past week, Windows 10 had clearly run out of patience with me.  My computer launched into a constant cycle of downloading the update, trying to install it, reporting that it was restoring my previous version, then saying that the update to version 1709 had failed.  I did a little research about what Windows had changed for DRM in version 1709.  It looked like the only music that would be affected were WMA files, of which I had none.  All of my music is MP3 format.

After a lot of troubleshooting, which resulted in my operating system crashing once, requiring a disc restoration, I finally clicked on the OK, I understand button and I thought I was good to go.

What followed was the same cycle of downloading the update, trying to install it, restoring to the previous update, which is version 1511, then advising that the update to version 1709 had again failed.  I did additional research to try to find a reason why the update was failing.  At some point, after wasting many hours trying to fix the problem, I decided I had enough.

My final option in this saga was to try to find a way to turn off Windows Update.  The computer with this update problem is over 5 years old and I decided that being stuck with version 1511 until the computer stopped working completely was my best option.  If you find that you are in the same situation that I have described, what follows is a description of what I did to pull the plug on Windows Update.

  1. Open the Control Panel.
  2. Click on Administrative Tools.
  3. Double-click on Services.
  4. Right-click on Update Orchestrator Service.
  5. Select Properties.
  6. Click the Stop button.
  7. Above the Service Status (which should now say Stopped), there is a drop-down menu. Select Disabled, then click Apply and click OK.
  8. Scroll down and right-click on Windows Update.
  9. Select Properties.
  10. Click the Stop button.
  11. Above the Service Status (which should now say Stopped), there is a drop-down menu. Select Disabled, then click Apply and click OK.
  12. Close the Services window.
  13. Double-click on Task Scheduler.
  14. In the left window pane, drill down to the directory Task Scheduler Library / Microsoft / Windows.
  15. Click on UpdateOrchestrator so that it is highlighted.
  16. In the center top window pane, I had 10 scheduled tasks.  For each of these tasks, click to highlight, then in the right window pane, find Disable and click.  The corresponding task in the center top window pane should now show Disabled for a status.  Do this for each task until they all show a status of Disabled.
  17. In the left window pane, click on WindowsUpdate to select it.
  18. In the center top window pane, I had 4 scheduled tasks.  For each of these tasks, click to highlight, then in the right window pane, find Disable and click.  The corresponding task in the center top window pane should now show Disabled for a status.  Do this for each task until they all show a status of Disabled.
  19. Close the Task Scheduler window.
  20. Close the Administrative Tools window.
  21. Close the Control Panel.
  22. Click the Windows Start MenuPowerRestart.

If, during the above procedure, Windows tries to interrupt you with the update it is trying to install, I was able to interrupt the update by just restarting the computer.  So far, I haven’t heard from Windows Update.  If my situation changes, I will update this post.  My computer will no longer update itself, which is a downside.  The upside is that I am spared the endless update/restore cycles.

One thought on “Windows 10 Version 1709 Failure

  1. Pingback: It is possible to say goodbye to Microsoft Windows – TahitiChris

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